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October 21, 2014 at 12:11am
1,371 notes
Reblogged from beautifulpicturesofhealthyfood

beautifulpicturesofhealthyfood:

Sweet Potato & Avocado Yaki Onigiri: a great variation of your favorite sushi rolls (gluten free, vegan)…RECIPE

October 20, 2014 at 1:15am
2,127 notes
Reblogged from thegrumpystudent
thegrumpystudent:

How to Study for Exams From the First Day of School- Short ways to Ace your Exams 

Recently, I’ve been trying to pick up differences in the ways I study and the way some of my friends study and I feel like almost every single one of them get stressed during exam time. The main reason? They wait too long to start studying and then freak out when they realise how much they have to do. And then there’s me, completely chill, got all ten hours of sleep and feel ready to set the exam. That’s not because I’m some kind of genius, it’s all because I start studying for exams the very minute school opens. Sounds weird, (and slightly nerdy) but  by consistently studying a bit everyday, it’s so much easier to do well in exams. Before I give you my tips, there’s one thing you should know….
DON’T leave studying till a week before an exam— I feel like a lot of people say that you should start studying early, but their definition of “early” is a week. How are you supposed to go over a whole year or half years worth of work, do practice questions, figure out what you need to work on, get help and clear your doubts and make sure you have everything you need to know in a WEEK? It might work for some of you, but for most, that’s the worst thing you could ever do. 
So onto my ways to study for exams the minute school opens! 
1. In each class, write down a couple of dot points about what you covered that lesson. For example, I’ll use Biology. If your teacher covered osmosis, diffusion and active transport in a lesson, write those topics down. Don’t be lazy about this, because if you do it consistently, at the end of the year, you’ll have a rough revision sheet of all the topics you need to cover in the exam before the teacher even hands them out. 
2. Everyday, or even every two days, go back over everything you’ve learned so far. The method I like the best to do this is to read through the notes once and write up questions, so I can make sure I know the concepts. My textbooks also have questions at the end of each chapter and after a few concepts, so i look for those and do them as well. 
3. Pinpoint what you don’t know straight away. If you’re going through your algebra work and can’t do certain questions, find out how to do them as soon as possible. That way, towards exam time, you won’t have a whole bunch of stuff you don’t know how to do. 
4. Try to get work done everyday. Everyone’s busy and everyone deserves some downtime away from school, but try to at least study 45 mins to an hour everyday. It’ll get you in the habit of working and you’ll get stuff done without even realising it. 
5. Get ahead! Ask your teacher what the next topics he/she is going through will be and find out if there are any exercises or questions they want you to focus on. Finish up the chapter your class is working on and keep moving forward if you’re done before everyone else. Not only do you get more time to learn all your information and don’t have to deal with the stress of having exams around the corner and your teacher still has completed the syllabus. 
7. Remember that you can always learn more. If you’ve written all your notes for the next five chapters, done all the questions, got any questions answered by the teachers and are sitting back thinking, what now? DON’T forget about your work. That’s just as bad as studying a few days before the exam. Find practice tests or worksheets that deal with your topic online, watch revision videos on youtube, use different methods of studying like flashcards, try studying with other people, or even become a tutor if you think you’re good enough at the subject. All these will help your mind to not forget about what you’ve learned and help reinforce it. 

So those are my tips for studying for exams from day 1. I’ve done all of this and continue to do so, and can’t remember the last time I actually worried about an exam. I hope I helped! 

thegrumpystudent:

How to Study for Exams From the First Day of School- Short ways to Ace your Exams 

Recently, I’ve been trying to pick up differences in the ways I study and the way some of my friends study and I feel like almost every single one of them get stressed during exam time. The main reason? They wait too long to start studying and then freak out when they realise how much they have to do. And then there’s me, completely chill, got all ten hours of sleep and feel ready to set the exam. That’s not because I’m some kind of genius, it’s all because I start studying for exams the very minute school opens. Sounds weird, (and slightly nerdy) but  by consistently studying a bit everyday, it’s so much easier to do well in exams. Before I give you my tips, there’s one thing you should know….

  • DON’T leave studying till a week before an exam— I feel like a lot of people say that you should start studying early, but their definition of “early” is a week. How are you supposed to go over a whole year or half years worth of work, do practice questions, figure out what you need to work on, get help and clear your doubts and make sure you have everything you need to know in a WEEK? It might work for some of you, but for most, that’s the worst thing you could ever do. 

So onto my ways to study for exams the minute school opens! 

1. In each class, write down a couple of dot points about what you covered that lesson. For example, I’ll use Biology. If your teacher covered osmosis, diffusion and active transport in a lesson, write those topics down. Don’t be lazy about this, because if you do it consistently, at the end of the year, you’ll have a rough revision sheet of all the topics you need to cover in the exam before the teacher even hands them out. 

2. Everyday, or even every two days, go back over everything you’ve learned so far. The method I like the best to do this is to read through the notes once and write up questions, so I can make sure I know the concepts. My textbooks also have questions at the end of each chapter and after a few concepts, so i look for those and do them as well. 

3. Pinpoint what you don’t know straight away. If you’re going through your algebra work and can’t do certain questions, find out how to do them as soon as possible. That way, towards exam time, you won’t have a whole bunch of stuff you don’t know how to do. 

4. Try to get work done everyday. Everyone’s busy and everyone deserves some downtime away from school, but try to at least study 45 mins to an hour everyday. It’ll get you in the habit of working and you’ll get stuff done without even realising it. 

5. Get ahead! Ask your teacher what the next topics he/she is going through will be and find out if there are any exercises or questions they want you to focus on. Finish up the chapter your class is working on and keep moving forward if you’re done before everyone else. Not only do you get more time to learn all your information and don’t have to deal with the stress of having exams around the corner and your teacher still has completed the syllabus. 

7. Remember that you can always learn more. If you’ve written all your notes for the next five chapters, done all the questions, got any questions answered by the teachers and are sitting back thinking, what now? DON’T forget about your work. That’s just as bad as studying a few days before the exam. Find practice tests or worksheets that deal with your topic online, watch revision videos on youtube, use different methods of studying like flashcards, try studying with other people, or even become a tutor if you think you’re good enough at the subject. All these will help your mind to not forget about what you’ve learned and help reinforce it. 

So those are my tips for studying for exams from day 1. I’ve done all of this and continue to do so, and can’t remember the last time I actually worried about an exam. I hope I helped! 

(via timelordemort)

12:56am
6 notes
Reblogged from rgr-pop

rgr-pop:

That Christopher’s Liver song came off a tape I got from that boy I didn’t really know in Minneapolis, which remains (I’m sorry) the best mix I’ve ever gotten, which, of course, I never reciprocated, as much work as I did emoting over it, instead of emoting over the real. I wrote about him in that letter too, I told her I haven’t talked to him in a long time because he’s weird about internet relationships. That mix endured but this mix I made is maybe the first mix I’ve ever really made that was perfectly descriptive and frozen and I didn’t even realize it was happening until years after.

12:50am
46 notes
Reblogged from thefoodshow
thefoodshow:

How To Make The Perfect Tea Latte

thefoodshow:

How To Make The Perfect Tea Latte

(via perplexedhedgehog)

12:46am
314 notes
Reblogged from foodffs
foodffs:

Waffle Iron Ramen
Really nice recipes. Every hour.

foodffs:

Waffle Iron Ramen

Really nice recipes. Every hour.

12:12am
896 notes
Reblogged from gastrogirl
gastrogirl:

sweet and spicy butternut squash pizza with bacon.

gastrogirl:

sweet and spicy butternut squash pizza with bacon.

October 19, 2014 at 11:32pm
839 notes
Reblogged from foodffs

foodffs:

Apple Cider Cupcakes with Nutmeg Frosting

Really nice recipes. Every hour.

11:28pm
4,300 notes
Reblogged from itscolossal

beesandbombs:

itscolossal:

Dizzying New GIFs at the Intersection of Art and Math by Dave Whyte [sponsored]

some new gifs here too! check em out.

(via jampbeethoven)

11:28pm
165 notes
Reblogged from betterthandarkchocolate

Perfectionism and Procrastination

betterthandarkchocolate:

When perfectionism and procrastination combine, you can be your own worst enemy. By freeing yourself from this complex process, you can better use your time to accomplish more with less stress. Here you’ll see a sample of how this process works, a case example, and some ideas for breaking the perfectionism-procrastination connection.

What is perfectionism? Is it stretching for excellence in areas of your life that you find purposeful? Is it pattern of nit picking, defect detecting, and controlling? Do you  hold to lofty standards, demand perfection from yourself, and make your worth contingent on meeting lofty standards? Depending on your definition, it can be any one of the three. I’ll focus on demanding perfection. If you dread the thought of performing poorly, you may experience anxiety if you anticipate a substandard performance. What you fear is based on what you think of yourself if you fall below your standards. You may also feel anxious thinking that others will also judge you as a failure.

Contingent-worth anxiety thinking is a form of dichotomous thinking.  You see future performances as successes or failures and measure your personal worth according to this same judgmental process. You are a winner or a loser, worthy or worthless, strong or weak, and so the list goes on. For example, you decide that a B+ grade is respectable. You expect this performance from yourself. The goal is reasonable. The expectation is not. You get a B and feel like a failure. In a perfectionist world of fixed convictions, it is not enough to do well enough; you have to do perfectly well. It’s not enough to have typical performances; they must be exceptional. When attaining perfection becomes a contingency for worth, anxiety is a common consequence. 

Perfectionism is a risk factor for performance anxiety and procrastination.  You expect a great performance. You have doubts whether you can achieve perfection. You have an urge to diverge and do something less threatening.  Therefore, you wait until you can be perfect. This is an example of perfectionism-driven procrastination. A perfectionism-procrastination process contributes to what Rockefeller University professor Bruce McEwen describes as an allostatic load. This is a wearing and tearing of the body due to stress. If you hear your inner voice telling you that if you are not great you are a big nothing, you’ve found an anxiety belief that adds to your allostatic load. Uncoupling yourself from this thinking can help end this perfectionism-related stress.

Perfectionism is a changeable form of thinking. For example, you are always more complex than what you produce, so you can’t be either perfect or imperfect. This is the concept of the pluralistic self and here is how pluralism works. You are a person with many attributes, your self-worth does not depend on a singular life aspect. ie. grades. To combat perfectionist thinking work at accepting this pluralistic view of you, and you are on your way toward easing up on yourself and achieving more of what you desire.

Steps to Overcome Perfectionism

Step 1: In your journal, answer the following questions: 
a. What characteristics of perfectionism are true for me? How do these perfectionist traits impede my efforts to change my problematic behavior?
b. What irrational beliefs of perfectionists do I ascribe to? How do these beliefs influence my desire to change? How do these beliefs contribute to a failure script in my efforts to change? What rational alternatives can I adopt to reduce the negative impact of perfectionism in my life?
c. What are the negative consequences of perfectionism in my life? What am I doing to address these negative issues in my life? How do these negative issues affect my past and current efforts to change my problematical behavior?
d. What new rational behavior do I need to develop in order to overcome the negative impact of perfectionism? How will these new behavior traits help me to fully achieve change in my life?
e. How can my social support system help me in overcoming my perfectionist attitude? What contributes to perfectionism in my support system? What changes in my support system would reduce its perfectionist character?
f. How does dealing with my perfectionism help me in my efforts to change? How well does perfectionism explain why past attempts to change have failed?

Step 2: In your journal, identify a problematic behavioral pattern you want to change; then list the characteristic negative behavior traits of the pattern. For each of the negative characteristics list positive alternative behavior traits. For each of the new alternative behavior list your likelihood of achieving them 100 percent of the time. How many new behavior traits could you achieve 100 percent of the time?

Step 3: Once you have recognized that no change can be achieved 100 percent of the time, continue changing your problematic behavior patterns. If you continue to be hindered by perfectionism, return to Step 1 and begin again.

For more tips on combating procrastination you might find this video helpful: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jNnXseUr8sM&context=C3d2436aADOEgsToPDskKh6sw4U-Wj632iLbVbsrCH 

(via stillauniverse)

October 16, 2014 at 3:49pm
462 notes
Reblogged from casababe

casababe:

listen here [x]

(via soaringleap)